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CB00006

CW2900-I WOOD INSERT

Heating area 500 - 2,100 Ft2
Size 28 3/8" W X 26 1/8" D X 23 1/8" H
Maximum log length 20"
Average particulate emissions rate (1) 3.9 g/h

From USD $1,199.00

Available in the following stores:

638-1387

*on sale

39860264

*on sale

If your dealer is out of stock, we can supply them within approximately five business days.

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  • Description
  • Options and Accessories
  • Specs / Manual
  • Support and parts
  • Reviews (8)

Description

The CW2900 is a high efficiency, EPA certified wood insert. With its standard blower and large fire viewing area,  it will revive your old masonry fireplace and warm up the inside of your house.

The 32" x 50" faceplate kit is included on this model.

Discover the additional qualities of the CW2900 Century wood insert

 

Government incentives may apply to this product.
LEARN MORE

November Promotion

Offer valid from November 1st to 30th, 2017

Get a $150 manufacturer’s mail-in rebate with any Century wood insert combined with a Vortex liner kit (VOLKI-625 or VOLKI-635)

Claim promotion*

*Before January 31st, 2018

Register your warranty

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Options and Accessories

Options

Picture
Part number and description
Price
Shipping time

5' FRESH AIR INTAKE KIT OVAL

5" FRESH AIR INTAKE KIT OVAL - AC01298

From USD $35.00 MSRP

In stock

5''Ø FRESH AIR INTAKE REGISTER WITH AIRTIGHT DAMPER

5''Ø FRESH AIR INTAKE REGISTER WITH AIRTIGHT DAMPER - AC01349
Download the owner's manual >

From USD $69.00 MSRP

In stock

6'Ø X 25' VORTEX STAINLESS FLEX LINER KIT FOR INSERTS

6"Ø X 25' VORTEX STAINLESS FLEX LINER KIT FOR INSERTS - VOLKI-625

From USD $269.00 MSRP

In production

6'Ø X 35' VORTEX STAINLESS FLEX LINER KIT FOR INSERTS

6"Ø X 35' VORTEX STAINLESS FLEX LINER KIT FOR INSERTS - VOLKI-635

From USD $379.00 MSRP

In stock

7 3/16' X 26' HEAT SHIELD FOR SURROUND/SHELF

7 3/16" X 26" HEAT SHIELD FOR SURROUND/SHELF - AC01317

From USD $65.00 MSRP

In stock

HOOK UP LINER ADAPTOR

HOOK UP LINER ADAPTOR - AC02006
Download the owner's manual >

From USD $55.00 MSRP

In stock

OFFSET LINER ADAPTOR

OFFSET LINER ADAPTOR - AC01370
Download the owner's manual >

From USD $129.00 MSRP

In stock

RIGID FIRESCREEN

RIGID FIRESCREEN - AC01315

From USD $89.00 MSRP

In stock

Accessories

Adhesives, gaskets and insulation

Picture
Part number and description
Shipping time

HIGH TEMPERATURE RED SILICONE (300 mL- 10.1 FL.OZ.)

AC02040
HIGH TEMPERATURE RED SILICONE (300 mL- 10.1 FL.OZ.)

A premium quality 100% silicone sealant that stays permanently flexible. Suitable for sealing around oven windows, flues on gas appliances, joints and metal stacks and ductwork. An excellent gasket maker to replace existing cork and felt rubber. Ideal for holding gaskets around stove and fireplace doors. Oxygen sensor safe. Withstands continuous temperatures up to 260°C or 500°F.

USD $7.00
In stock

HIGH TEMPERATURE CLEAR SILICONE (300 mL - 10.1 FL.OZ.)

AC02045
HIGH TEMPERATURE CLEAR SILICONE (300 mL - 10.1 FL.OZ.)

A premium quality 100% silicone sealant that stays permanently flexible. Suitable for sealing around oven windows, flues on gas appliances, joints and metal stacks and ductwork. An excellent gasket maker to replace existing cork and felt rubber. Ideal for holding gaskets around stove and fireplace doors. Oxygen sensor safe. Withstands continuous temperatures up to 204°C or 400°F.

USD $6.00
In stock

HIGH TEMPERATURE RED SILICONE (83 mL - 2.8 FL.OZ.)

AC07850
HIGH TEMPERATURE RED SILICONE (83 mL - 2.8 FL.OZ.)
USD $5.00
In stock

Paint

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Part number and description
Shipping time

METALLIC BLACK STOVE PAINT - 342 g (12oz) AEROSOL

AC05959
METALLIC BLACK STOVE PAINT - 342 g (12oz) AEROSOL

High temperature paint with quick drying, lead free. Excellent adherence and color retention.

USD $10.00
In stock

METALLIC BLACK STOVE PAINT - 85 g (3oz) AEROSOL

AC05963
METALLIC BLACK STOVE PAINT - 85 g (3oz) AEROSOL
Fits most products with a metallic black finish.
USD $6.00
In stock

Maintenance products

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Part number and description
Shipping time

STOVE AND FURNACE CEMENT (300 mL - 10.1 FL.OZ.)

AC02540
STOVE AND FURNACE CEMENT (300 mL - 10.1 FL.OZ.)

Dries to seal cracks and joints to prevent smoke or air leaks. SBI Stove & Furnace Cement may be used in stoves, furnaces, boilers, fireplaces (all fuels), combustion chambers, firedoors, flue and chimney joints, brick linings, gasketing.

USD $5.00
In stock

ASH VACUUM CLEANER

AC02582
ASH VACUUM CLEANER

Conforms to UL STD. 1017. Certified to CSA STD. C22.2 No. 243-10. Avoid ending prematurely the life of your vacuum cleaner by using the ideal tool to suck up the completely cooled ashes of your wood or pellet appliance. Designed almost exclusively for ash collection, this ash vacuum cleaner will offer several years of service with proper care. Power: 800 W.

Download the owner's manual  >

USD $89.00
In stock

METAL POLISH (236 mL - 8.0 FL.OZ.)

AC02590
METAL POLISH (236 mL - 8.0 FL.OZ.)
USD $5.00
Contact dealer

6" ROUND BRUSH WITH POLYPROPYLENE BRISTLES (3/8" NPT)

AC04500
6" ROUND BRUSH WITH POLYPROPYLENE BRISTLES (3/8" NPT)

Ideal to prevent creosote build-up inside the chimney.

USD $10.00
In stock

KEVLAR WOOD STOVE AND FIREPLACE GLOVES

AC07820
KEVLAR WOOD STOVE AND FIREPLACE GLOVES

Recommended for a clean and safe use of any type of wood-burning appliance. Fire-resistant kevlar sewings.

USD $15.00
In stock

19" KEVLAR THREAD SEWN FIREPLACE GLOVES

AC07822
19" KEVLAR THREAD SEWN FIREPLACE GLOVES

Thermal protective gloves with long cuffs (19" or 48 cm):

  • Ideal for stove, fireplace and barbecue
  • Highly resistant to high temperatures
  • Genuine leather and kevlar seams for increased durability
  • Maximum protection against all heat sources (covers the entire forearm)
  • Strong and flexible glove with reinforcement at the level of the hand
  • One-sized with cotton lining for comfort
  • Practical leather support buckle
USD $25.00
In stock

DRY CLEANING PAD

AC07824
DRY CLEANING PAD

Easily cleans the soot from glass without water.

USD $10.00
In stock

WOOD APPLIANCE GLASS CLEANER (500 mL - 16.9 FL.OZ.)

AC07825
WOOD APPLIANCE GLASS CLEANER (500 mL - 16.9 FL.OZ.)
USD $6.00
In stock

Meters

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Part number and description
Shipping time

DIGITAL MOISTURE READER

AC07835
DIGITAL MOISTURE READER

Accurately and professionally measures moisture in wood logs.

Download the owner's manual  >

USD $45.00
In stock

Adapters

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Part number and description
Shipping time

HOOK UP LINER ADAPTOR

AC02006
HOOK UP LINER ADAPTOR

Allows to attach the flexible liner to an insert’s flue collar from inside the firebox.

Download the owner's manual  >

USD $55.00
In stock

5"Ø X 10' INSULATED FLEX PIPE FOR FRESH AIR INTAKE KIT

AC02093
5"Ø X 10' INSULATED FLEX PIPE FOR FRESH AIR INTAKE KIT

Certified according to ULC S110/UL 181, this insulated flexible air duct is composed of four (4) layers of polyester encapsulating a galvanized wire; all assembled with a flame retardant adhesive. Fully water repellent, the duct is corrosion resistant as well as high static pressure thanks to the unique four-layer lamination process and wall thickness. The insulation contains no hazardous substances that may pose a health hazard.

USD $35.00
In stock

5"Ø X 25' INSULATED FLEX PIPE FOR FRESH AIR INTAKE KIT

AC02094
5"Ø X 25' INSULATED FLEX PIPE FOR FRESH AIR INTAKE KIT

Certified according to ULC S110/UL 181, this insulated flexible air duct is composed of four (4) layers of polyester encapsulating a galvanized wire; all assembled with a flame retardant adhesive. Fully water repellent, the duct is corrosion resistant as well as high static pressure thanks to the unique four-layer lamination process and wall thickness. The insulation contains no hazardous substances that may pose a health hazard.

USD $55.00
In stock

Options

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Part number and description
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6" DRAW COLLAR FOR WOOD INSERT

AC02613
6" DRAW COLLAR FOR WOOD INSERT

Download the owner's manual  >

USD $249.00
In stock

Fire starters

Picture
Part number and description
Shipping time

FIRE LIGHTING GEL (1 L - 32 FL.OZ.)

AC02550
FIRE LIGHTING GEL (1 L - 32 FL.OZ.)

Recommended for lighting-up oil, wood and pellet stoves. Leaves no residue. Odorless.

USD $9.00
In stock

SACHET POUCHES FIRE STARTER

AC02597
SACHET POUCHES FIRE STARTER

Paraffin sachet pouches. Odorless.

USD $8.00
In stock

ONE-STRIKE FIRE STARTER

AC02598
ONE-STRIKE FIRE STARTER

Specially treated fibrous wood prepared with paraffin wax, pre-cut into sticks with ignition head on the bottom of the sticks and striking surface on package.

USD $7.00
In stock

WOOD AND PARAFFIN FIRE STARTER CUBES

AC02599
WOOD AND PARAFFIN FIRE STARTER CUBES

• Only made from wood and paraffin wax without additional
   chemicals (like formaldehyde)
• Safe, odorless, soot less, strong burning
• Easy to handle and easy to use
• Can be stored indefinitely and does not dry out
• Burn for 12 minuts

 

USD $8.00
In stock

FIRE LIGHTING GEL (500 mL - 16 FL.OZ.)

AC04099
FIRE LIGHTING GEL (500 mL - 16 FL.OZ.)
USD $6.00
In stock

Others

Picture
Part number and description
Shipping time

SPLITZ-IT 5 TONNES ELECTRIC LOG SPLITTER

AC02585
SPLITZ-IT 5 TONNES ELECTRIC LOG SPLITTER

Portability Without a Hitch You just plug it in and start splitting. Easy grip handle allows you to take the splitter where you want it. For the occasional campfire or just to have enough wood for the week-end, the Splitz-It electric log splitter gets the job done. 120V- 50HZ. 1500W  IP54.

Download the owner's manual  >

USD $379.00
In stock

Hearth pads

Picture
Part number and description
Shipping time

MODULAR HEARTH PAD PROTECTION SYSTEM

AC02705
MODULAR HEARTH PAD PROTECTION SYSTEM

Ideal for floor protection for stoves and fireplaces.  Use as a protective and insulating layer under ceramic tile or other non-combustible materials.  Handles more easily than gypsum panels.               

Download the owner's manual  >

USD $319.00
In stock

Specs / Manual

Appliance performance (2)

Fuel type Dry cordwood
Recommended heating area (sq.ft.) () 500 - 2,100
Firebox volume (cu. ft.) 2.4
Maximum burn time () 8 h
Maximum heat output (dry cordwood) (3) 75,000 BTU/h (22.0 kW)
Overall heat output rate (min. to max.) (3) (4) 12,500 BTU/h (3.7 kW) to 31,300 BTU/h (9.2 kW)
Average overall efficiency (EPA cribs / Douglas fir) (4) 69.5 % (HHV) (5) 75.2 % (LHV) (6)
Average overall efficiency (dry cordwood) (4) N.A. (HHV) (5) N.A. (LHV) (6)
Optimum efficiency (7) (8) 77.2 %
Average particulate emissions rate (1) 3.9 g/h
Average CO (9) 137.4 g/h

(1) This appliance is officially tested and certified by an independent agency.

(2) Values are as measured per test method, except for the recommended heating area, firebox volume, maximum burn time and maximum heat output.

(3) The maximum heat output (dry cordwood) is based on a loading density varying between 15 lb/ft³ and 20 lb/ft³. Other performances are based on a fuel load prescribed by the standard. The specified loading density varies between 7 lb/ft³ and 12 lb/ft³. The moisture content is between 19% and 25%.

(4) As measured per CSA B415.1-10 stack loss method.

(5) Higher Heating Value of the fuel.

(6) Lower Heating Value of the fuel.

(7) Performances based on a fuel load prescribed by the standard at 7 lb/ft³ and with a moisture content between 19% and 25%.

(8) Optimum overall efficiency at a specific burn rate (LHV).

(9) Carbon monoxyde.

General features

Clearance – combustible side mantle to unit 12"
Clearance – side wall (room) 16"
Maximum log length 20"
Log positioning Over width
Chimney diameter 6"
Flue outlet diameter 6"
Type of chimney CAN/ULC S629, UL 103 HT (2100 °F)
Minimum chimney height (feet) 12'
Baffle type High quality vermiculite
Approved for a mobile home installation No
Shipping Weight 407 lb (185 kg)
Door type Single, glass with cast iron frame
Glass type Ceramic glass
Glass surface – dimensions (Width X Height) 16 1/2" X 9"
Glass air-wash system Yes
Premium quality blower included (CFM) 130
Overall dimension (Height) 23 1/8"
Overall dimension (Width) 28 3/8"
Overall dimension (Depth) 26 1/8"
Door opening – dimension (Height) 8 3/4"
Door opening - dimension (Width) 17 1/2"
Firebox – dimension (Height) 11 7/8"
Firebox – dimension (Width) 21"
Firebox – dimension (Depth) 16 3/4"
Firebox lined with refractory bricks for better heat distribution Yes
Stainless-steel secondary-air system improving gas combustion Yes
Adjustable threaded legs Yes
Steel thickness – body 3/16"
Steel thickness – top 5/16"
Centre line of flue outlet to the side 14 1/4"
Centre line of flue outlet to the back 6 7/8"
Fireplace opening – minimum (Height) 23 3/8"
Fireplace opening – minimum (Width) 28 7/8"
Fireplace opening – minimum (Depth) 15 7/8"
USA standard (emissions) EPA Method 28
Canadian Standard (emissions) CSA B415.1-10
USA standard (safety) UL 1482, UL 737
Canadian standard (safety) ULC S628
Tested and listed as per applicable standards By an accredited laboratory (CAN/USA)
Warranty Limited 5 years
Minimum clearances to combustibles*
(Data expressed in inches. 1 inch = 25.4 mm)
Canada USA
Clearance – top (measured from the platform on which the appliance is installed)** 84" 84"
Clearance – minimum floor protection in front of the appliance 18" 16"

* The information given on the certification label affixed to the appliance always overrides the information published in any other media (owner's manual, catalogues, flyers, magazines and/or web sites).

** Some appliances have been tested with a low ceiling. If necessary, consult the owner's manual for information on these clearances to combustible materials.

Support and parts

Need a replacement part for your appliance?

We have everything you need! Buy it online or from your local dealer.

NEED HELP ?
CONTACT-US !

1-418-908-8002
Monday to Friday
8h to 12h - 13h to 17h

Maintenance instructions

Why does the glass get sooty?

Possible causes and solutions:

1- The moisture content of your wood is too high.

Solution: Make sure you use good, seasoned cord wood. The wood you burn plays an important role in the overall performance of your heater. Your wood should have been properly dried for approximately one year. Storage is also key. Wood that has been cut for one, two or even more years, will not necessarily be dry if it has been stored in poor conditions. Under extreme conditions, it may have rotten instead of drying. Smaller pieces of wood will dry faster. The wood should be stored in a place where the grass is not too long, and where the wind will be able to circulate between the logs. A 12-inch gap should be kept between the cords. The wood should be placed in the sunniest area and should be protected from the rain and snow on top, but not on the sides. Use a moisture reader to measure the moisture content of your wood. Ideally, it should be below 25%.

2- The logs are positioned too close to the glass and are obstructing the air flow that is necessary to keep the glass clean.

Solution: Make sure to keep a minimum gap of 2 inches between the logs and the glass.

3- The chimney draft is too weak.

Solution #1: In many cases, a weak draft is simply due to insufficient heat in the exhaust system. Build a small, intense fire, and leave the door ajar (never leave the heater unattended). Before inserting larger logs, use dry kindling to obtain a good bed of red embers. Gradually increase the size of the logs. Close the unit’s door when you reach a flue temperature of approximately 475 °F on the chimney thermometer. Leave the air intake fully open for approximately 15 minutes. Then, gradually close the air intake control. Note that there is no danger in letting the temperature inside the flue reach approximately 700 °F during the start-up. This is even favorable in order to properly start your heater. You must, however, avoid maintaining excessive temperatures (above the comfort zone on your thermometer) during a long period of time. Your chimney thermometer should be positioned on the exhaust pipe, approximately 18 inches above the unit.

Solution #2: Your heater may not have all the oxygen it needs to allow for a sufficient draft. You first need to insure that the room where the heater is located is sufficiently large and well ventilated. Open the nearest window by approximately 2 inches. If you notice a significant improvement, it is a sign that the unit needs more oxygen. The room may be too insulated or too small. Without an additional source of oxygen, the draft will remain weak and cause the glass stay dirty.

Solution #3: The chimney may be too short. In order to obtain a sufficient draft, your chimney must have a minimum height. Twelve feet (from the heater to the chimney cap outside the house) is a minimum. A height of 15 feet or higher is ideal.

Solution #4: Your exhaust system may be too tortuous or may lack a sufficiently steep slope. Ideally, your exhaust system should not have more than one 90° elbow. Furthermore, all horizontal sections should be as short as possible and have a minimum slope of ¼" per foot.

Solution #5: Your exhaust system may be oversized. When your chimney is oversized, the volume of air that needs to be warmed-up is larger. It is therefore difficult to reach temperatures that will allow for a sufficient draft. Most advanced combustion systems (those certified to EPA/CSAB415.1-10) have a 6" flue outlet (152 mm). If your exhaust system does not have a 6" diameter, a solution is to insert a stainless liner with a 6" diameter inside the exhaust system.

Is the smoke produced during the paint curing process harmful?

First Fires

Most high-temperature paints react in the same way. There are two resins in the paint. One resin dries at room temperature, giving the paint the initial properties seen on a brand new stove. Then, when fires are built in the stove, this air-dry resin burns away. The other resin is a silicon resin (silicone gives the paint its high heat resistance) that will not cure until the appliance is heated at high temperatures. This occurs at around 400 °F – 450 °F. The air dry resin will burn away at about 600 °F.

We recommend a two-stage curing process. Do not burn at full heat (keep temperature below 900 °F) for the first two burns as this could “shock” the paint and cause damage. Paint may peel or discolor. The initial fire should be made at a medium temperature (450 °F) for about 60 minutes. As the paint heats-up, it will soften and even appear wet. It should not be touched with anything. Gradually, on the hottest spots (usually near the flue and working outwards) the paint will again appear dry. When this process is completed, the paint will be ready for the next stage.

A second, hotter burn of around 600 °F for another 45 minutes will burn away the air-dry resin. You will know when this occurs because the process creates some smoke and odour. The non-toxic smoke is primarily carbon dioxide, but there are other residual components that make it smell bad and may cause physical distress for some individuals or animals. This is why we recommend keeping the space vacant and ventilated. Until the second stage is reached, the curing process will be incomplete.

Paint may appear to be a little glossy when first applied. High heat will cause all liquid paint to lose its glossy appearance.

 

How do I reduce the amount of charcoal my heater produces?

Appliances that are EPA or CSAB415.1 certified tend to create larger coal beds due to their higher efficiency. This can be controlled by the way you burn your appliance. After an overnight burn, you may have a more significant coal bed. Simply rake the coal bed forward and add a smaller piece of wood on top. Burn the appliance on a higher setting (air control fully open). This will pull more primary air into the firebox and will increase draft. The coal bed will burn down with the log. You may have to repeat this operation a couple of times before the coals are reduced. You are then ready to load your appliance with a larger fuel load.

Tech support

Do I need an EPA certified or CSAB415.1-10 certified heater?

You first have to identify what your needs are. If you are looking for ambiance, a temporary heat source in a cottage or a camp, or a simple back-up heat source in case of power failure, you do not necessarily need to invest more money in order to buy an EPA or CSAB415.1-10 certified wood heater. However, if your goal is to heat on a regular basis, the extra dollars will prove to be a good investment. Furthermore, it must be noted that certified heaters release up to 90% less particles into the atmosphere, which makes wood a renewable and clean source of heat. As a result, if the style and size of the heater you are looking for is available in a certified version, it is highly recommended that you invest in this advanced combustion technology. You will help the environment and reduce your wood consumption by up to 30%.

NOTE: If you live in the United Sates, British Columbia, Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick or Newfoundland, EPA certified wood heaters are mandatory. Exceptions apply for certain categories of products, such as decorative fireplaces. Certain municipalities may also have by-laws that require the installation of an EPA or CSAB415.1-10 wood heater, even though the province does not have an official regulation on wood heating. It must also be noted that in Canada, the CSAB415.1-10 Standard is equivalent to the EPA Standard. A wood heater that meets this Standard will generally comply with the regulation in place.


How do I determine the size of heater I need and where should I install it?

Before answering this question, it is very important that you clearly identify what your needs are. Some people will buy a heater simply to enhance the ambiance of a room, while others will buy a heater as their main source of heat. There is no good or bad reason for buying a wood-heat system. If you simply want to enhance the ambiance of a room, most small to medium size heaters will suit your needs. Simply chose the style you like best, and put the unit in the room where you spend the most time. The heat and look of a glowing fire will create an atmosphere of warmth and coziness.

If your primary need is to heat, you must verify the heating capacity of your heater based on the technical data provided by the manufacturer. For instance, if you want to heat an 800-square-foot area on one floor, you need to buy a heater with a minimum capacity of 800 sq. ft.

If you need to heat more than one floor, keep in mind that heat rises. Therefore, a heater located in your basement will help you heat the main floor as well. However, the contrary is not true; a heater located on the main floor (ground floor) will not heat the basement. Keep in mind also that the more divisions there are in the house, the harder it will be to distribute the heat evenly.

If you need to heat two floors, calculate the surface of the lower floor. Then, add 50% of the surface of the upper floor. For instance, if you install a wood-heating system in the basement and you have 800 sq.ft., you will need a heater with a minimum capacity of 1,200 sq.ft. (800 + 400 = 1,200.

If you need to heat more than two floors, calculate the surface of the lower floor (where the wood-heating system is located). Then, add 50% of the surface of the middle floor, and 25% of the surface of the upper floor. For instance, if you install a heater in the basement and you have 800 sq.ft., you will need a heater with a minimum capacity of 1,400 sq.ft. (800+400+200= 1,400). Consult the drawing below. It will help you understand the explanations provided in this section.

REMEMBER: We are talking about "zone" heating, not central heating. The room where the heater is located and the rooms directly above it will always reach higher temperatures than the rooms distant from the unit. If you want an even temperature throughout the house, you need to consider a central heating system, such as a warm air wood furnace. Furthermore, you must keep in mind that the size of the heater you need may vary based on the insulation of your house, its exposure to wind, and the number of windows. It will always be prudent to buy a heater with a capacity that is slightly higher than the minimum capacity that you need. For instance, if you need a minimum capacity of 1,400 sq.ft., it will be more prudent to buy a heater with a capacity of 1,600 sq.ft., if not 1,800 sq.ft. There are three main advantages in buying a larger appliance: the increased heating capacity, the ease of loading more and larger logs (as a result of the greater firebox volume), and the increased combustion time (given the higher loading capacity).

The drawing above gives an example of the minimum heating capacity required for a wood-heating system installed in a house with three floors of 800 sq.ft. each. We assume that the house is well insulated and that air can circulate between each floor through an open stairway and/or floor traps.

Why is the efficiency as per the EPA’s test data smaller than the publicized optimum efficiency?

EPA refers to the CSAB415.1-10 standard for the calculation of the appliance’s efficiency. The efficiency reported as per EPA’s directives consists of an average between four different burn rates, ranging from the lowest burn rate (air intake completely closed) to the highest burn rate (air intake completely open). The optimum efficiency that we publicize is the efficiency obtained according to the same test data, but for the low burn rate only. This efficiency is more realistic for a majority of users whose heating needs require that the unit be used to maximize burn times.

Does my heater qualify under the LEED program?

The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System™ encourages and accelerates global adoption of sustainable green building and development practices through the creation and implementation of universally understood and accepted tools and performance criteria. LEED is a third-party certification program and an internationally accepted benchmark for the design, construction and operation of high performance green buildings. It provides building owners and operators the tools they need to have an immediate and measurable impact on their buildings’ performance.

The Canadian Green Building Council (CGBC) certifies LEED projects. The Certification is based on the total point score achieved, following an independent review and an audit of selected Credits. With four possible levels of certification (certified, silver, gold and platinum), LEED® is flexible enough to accommodate a wide range of green building strategies that best fit the constraints and goals of particular projects. The Canadian rating systems are an adaptation of the US Green Building Council's (USGBC) LEED Green Building Rating System, tailored specifically for Canadian climates, construction practices and regulations. The rating systems are adapted to the Canadian market through an inclusive process that engages stakeholders and experts representing the various sectors of the Canadian industry.

Wood or pellet stoves, fireplaces, and inserts can qualify under LEED and obtain up to one point provided that they meet the following criteria.





Why doesn't my heater produce enough heat?

Possible causes and solutions:

1- The moisture content of your wood is too high.

Solution: Make sure you use good, seasoned wood. The wood you burn plays an important role in the overall performance of your heater. Your wood should have been properly dried for about one year. Furthermore, it is better to use hardwood, such as oak, maple, beech, or ash. For the same volume, hardwood will produce more heat. Storage is also very important. Wood that has been cut for one, two or even more years, will not necessarily be dry if it has been stored in poor conditions. Under extreme conditions, it may have rotted instead of drying. Smaller pieces of wood will dry faster. The wood should be stored in a place where the grass is not too long, and where the wind will be able to circulate between the logs. A 12-inch gap should be kept between the cords. The wood should be placed in the sunniest area and should be protected from the rain and snow on top, but not on the sides. Use a moisture reader to measure the moisture content of your wood. Ideally, it should be below 25%.

2- The air control mechanism is not open enough.

Solution: Adjust the air control mechanism in order to keep the flue temperature within the comfort zone (between 250 °F and 475 °F) on your chimney thermometer. The air control mechanism must always be closed gradually. You need to obtain a good bed of red embers and the logs must be completely lit up before you close the air control completely. This can easily take up to one hour.

3- The logs that you are using are too big.

Solution: Use smaller pieces of wood and place them to allow proper air circulation between the logs. The same weight of wood cut in many small pieces will produce more heat than fewer, larger logs. Only add big logs when you have a good bed of red embers. Logs with a diameter exceeding 6 inches should always be split. Avoid stacking logs to the top of the firebox.

4- The chimney draft is too weak.

Solution #1: In many cases, a weak draft is simply due to insufficient heat in the exhaust system. Build a small, intense fire, and leave the door ajar (never leave the heater unattended). Before inserting larger logs, use dry kindling to obtain a good bed of red embers. Gradually increase the size of the logs. Close the unit’s door when you reach a flue temperature of approximately 475 °F on the chimney thermometer. Leave the air intake fully open for approximately 15 minutes. Then, gradually close the air intake control. Note that there is no danger in letting the temperature inside the flue reach approximately 700 °F during the start-up. This is even favorable in order to properly start your heater. You must, however, avoid maintaining excessive temperatures (above the comfort zone on your thermometer) during a long period of time. Your chimney thermometer should be positioned on the exhaust pipe, approximately 18 inches above the unit.

Solution #2: Your heater may not have all the oxygen it needs to allow for a sufficient draft. You first need to ensure that the room where the heater is located is sufficiently large and well ventilated. Open the nearest window by approximately 2 inches. If you notice a significant improvement, it is a sign that the unit needs more oxygen. The room may be too insulated or too small. Without an additional source of oxygen, the draft will remain weak and cause the glass stay dirty.

Solution #3: The chimney may be too short. In order to obtain a sufficient draft, your chimney must have a minimum height. Twelve feet (from the heater to the chimney cap outside the house) is a minimum. A height of 15 feet or higher is ideal.

Solution #4: Your exhaust system may be too restrictive or may lack a sufficient rise. Ideally, your exhaust system should not have more than one 90° elbow. Furthermore, all horizontal sections should be as short as possible and have a minimum slope of ¼" per foot.

Solution #5: Your exhaust system may be oversized. When your chimney is oversized, the volume of air that needs to be warmed-up is larger. It is therefore difficult to reach temperatures that will allow for a sufficient draft. Most advanced combustion systems (those certified to EPA/CSAB415.1-10) have a 6" flue outlet (152 mm). If your exhaust system does not have a 6" diameter, a solution is to insert a stainless liner with a 6" diameter inside the exhaust system.

If you have verified all the points mentioned above and your heater works fine, but still does not produce enough heat, you may be asking for more than what your appliance can realistically give you.

Stoves, fireplaces, and inserts are used for "zone heating”. It is normal that the heat is distributed unevenly inside your home. It will always be colder in the rooms that are distant from the heater. Furthermore, since heat rises, a heater located at the ground-floor level will not heat your basement.

Solution 6: It is possible to increase heat circulation between the floors by installing floor traps. The location of your heater is also important. Try to install it in a central location. If you want to heat both your basement and the ground floor, install your heater in the basement. The heat will rise to the upper floors. Verify that the area you try to heat respects your appliance’s heating capacity. Your appliance’s heating capacity can be found on the printed literature, in the owner’s manual, or in the technical data section on our web site. Keep in mind that your appliance's heating capacity assumes optimum conditions. It may be too low in situations where a house is poorly insulated, or highly exposed to wind. If you already have an appliance with a high heating capacity that works normally but does not heat enough, you probably need a central heating system, such as a warm air wood furnace.

Why does the fire go out when I close the loading door?

Possible causes and solutions:

1- The moisture content of your wood is too high.

Solution: Make sure you use good, seasoned cord wood. The wood you burn plays an important role in the overall performance of your heater. Your wood should have been properly dried for approximately one year. Storage is also key. Wood that has been cut for one, two or even more years will not necessarily be dry if it has been stored in poor conditions. Under extreme conditions, it may have rotten instead of drying. Smaller pieces of wood will dry faster. The wood should be stored in a place where the grass is not too long, and where the wind will be able to circulate between the logs. A 12-inch gap should be kept between the cords. The wood should be placed in the sunniest area and should be protected from the rain and snow on top, but not on the sides. Use a moisture reader to measure the moisture content of your wood. Ideally, it should be below 25%.

2- The air control mechanism is not open enough.

Solution: Adjust the air control mechanism in order to keep the flue temperature within the comfort zone (between 250 °F and 475 °F) on your chimney thermometer. The air control mechanism must always be closed gradually. You need to obtain a good bed of red embers and the logs must be completely lit up before you close the air control completely. This can easily take up to one hour.

3- The logs that you are using are too big.

Solution: Use smaller pieces of wood and place them to allow proper air circulation between the logs. The same weight of wood cut in many small pieces will produce more heat than fewer, larger logs. Only add big logs when you have a good bed of red embers. Logs with a diameter exceeding 6 inches should always be split. Avoid stacking logs to the top of the firebox.

4- The chimney draft is too weak.

Solution #1: In many cases, a weak draft is simply due to insufficient heat in the exhaust system. Build a small, intense fire, and leave the door ajar (never leave the heater unattended). Before inserting larger logs, use dry kindling to obtain a good bed of red embers. Gradually increase the size of the logs. Close the unit’s door when you reach a flue temperature of approximately 475 °F on the chimney thermometer. Leave the air intake fully open for approximately 15 minutes. Then, gradually close the air intake control. Note that there is no danger in letting the temperature inside the flue reach approximately 700 °F during the start-up. This is even favorable in order to properly start your heater. You must, however, avoid maintaining excessive temperatures (above the comfort zone on your thermometer) during a long period of time. Your chimney thermometer should be positioned on the exhaust pipe, approximately 18 inches above the unit.

Solution #2: Your heater may not have all the oxygen it needs to allow for a sufficient draft. You first need to ensure that the room where the heater is located is sufficiently large and well ventilated. Open the nearest window by approximately 2 inches. If you notice a significant improvement, it is a sign that the unit needs more oxygen. The room may be too insulated or too small. Without an additional source of oxygen, the draft will remain weak and cause the glass stay dirty.

Solution #3: The chimney may be too short. In order to obtain a sufficient draft, your chimney must have a minimum height. Twelve feet (from the heater to the chimney cap outside the house) is a minimum. A height of 15 feet or higher is ideal.

Solution #4: Your exhaust system may be too tortuous or may lack a sufficiently steep slope. Ideally, your exhaust system should not have more than one 90° elbow. Furthermore, all horizontal sections should be as short as possible and have a minimum slope of 1/4" per foot.

Solution #5: Your exhaust system may be oversized. When your chimney is oversized, the volume of air that needs to be warmed-up is larger. It is therefore difficult to reach temperatures that will allow for a sufficient draft. Most advanced combustion systems (those certified to EPA/CSAB415.1-10) have a 6" flue outlet (152 mm). If your exhaust system does not have a 6" diameter, a solution is to insert a stainless liner with a 6" diameter inside the exhaust system.

Why is the BTU according to EPA test data smaller than the one advertised?

 

You will notice a difference between the BTU output as per the EPA’s test data and what is advertised on our web site and/or product literature. The maximum BTU output we advertise is what will be obtained with a full load of seasoned cordwood inserted inside the firebox. The EPA output, on the other hand, is what has been obtained during emissions testing. The EPA test procedure requires that a special type of wood is used and positioned inside the firebox in a manner that does not represent the way the firebox volume would normally be utilized using seasoned cordwood. The EPA test load is typically much smaller. Hence, the BTU as per the EPA’s test data is reduced. The BTU output that should be considered by a normal user is the one we advertise for seasoned cordwood.

 

Will my insert work in the case of a power failure?

Your insert can be used in a power failure. An insert is built like a wood stove. The only thing that will not work in a power failure is the blower. Operating your insert without the blower will not damage the unit. The disadvantage is that you will not benefit from the heat circulation around the insert’s jacket. Inserts come with a blower because a large portion of the unit is inserted into a masonry opening. The heat that radiates from the portion of the firebox inserted into the masonry hearth does not reach the room as it would with a freestanding wood stove. This is why inserts have a jacket built around the back portion of their firebox. The heat is trapped inside that jacket and is pushed back in front of the stove and into the room with a blower. Without electricity, you will not recover as much heat from the unit. The radiating heat will come mainly from the glass and the front portion of the insert. 

Can I install my wood insert into an existing factory-built zero-clearance fireplace?

It is possible to install a wood insert into an existing factory-built zero-clearance fireplace. However, there currently exists no UL or ULC standard specific to that type of conversion. The first thing that must be verified is that the factory-built zero clearance fireplace is listed (it must be certified by a competent certification body such as Omni or Warnock Hersey). It must be suitable for use with solid fuel and nothing in the owner’s manual must specifically prohibit the installation of a fireplace insert. When in doubt, check with the fireplace manufacturer. The installation of the zero-clearance fireplace MUST be thoroughly inspected by a professional in order to ensure that it still meets the manufacturer’s specs and code conformity. The chimney must be of at least 1" (25 mm) larger in diameter to accommodate a required continuous stainless steel liner running from the flue collar to the top of the chimney termination.

Never remove parts that serve to insulate the zero-clearance fireplace from combustible material. Only readily detachable parts that are easily replaced, such as damper parts, screens, and doors, are to be removed from the fireplace. These parts must be stored nearby and available for retrofit if the insert is ever removed. Removal of any parts which render the fireplace unfit for use with solid fuel requires the fireplace to be permanently labelled by the installer as being no longer suitable for solid fuel until the removed parts are replaced and the fireplace is restored to its original certified condition. Furthermore, any air vents, grilles, or louvers that serve to create an air circulation pattern around and outside the zero-clearance fireplace shall never be removed.

What burn time will I get from my wood heater?

 

The combustion time for an EPA or CSAB415.1-10 certified, non-catalytic wood appliance depends on many factors, the most important being the size of its firebox. Heaters with a 2.0 cubic foot firebox or more will normally have longer burn-times. From 6 to 8 hours is about the burn time you will get. Some companies will advertise longer burn times, but be careful, this calculation is made from the time you light the fire to the time there is absolutely no combustible left into the firebox. No matter what the appliance model is, the maximum BTU output will be obtained over approximately 33% of the total burn cycle. This represents 2 to 3 hours for a medium-size stove. So realistically, you will have to reload the unit every 3 or 4 hours in order to get the maximum heat out of your appliance when you are home. If you don’t reload the heater and let it burn the remaining fuel, your output will slowly decrease until there is no useful heat left to produce (we call this the “tail end” of the combustion cycle). This “tail end” will provide heat for another 4 to 5 hours. So if you are looking for a 6 to 8-hour burn time, make sure you choose an EPA or CSAB415.1-10 certified wood heater with a BTU output (using cordwood) of 60,000 BTU or more. Appliances with that kind of output all have fairly large fireboxes. If you are going to rely mostly on wood for heating and your house has more than 2,000 square feet, do not hesitate to choose one of our larger units (>85,000 BTU). Those appliances will have a burn time of approximately 8 to 10 hours.

What is the advantage of installing a wood insert into a masonry fireplace?

 

An insert is a specially designed appliance intended for installation into a masonry fireplace. Inserts are used to convert conventional masonry fireplaces into effective heating systems. The insert firebox is surrounded by an outer shell. Room air flows between the insert body and the outer shell where it is heated before being returned to the room by natural convection or transferred mechanically. Most of the heat is delivered to the room instead of being trapped behind the insert in the masonry structure. A decorative faceplate covers the space between the insert and the fireplace opening.

A Guide to Residential Wood Heating



 

Why does my wood insert blower not move a lot of air?

All of our inserts and blowers are designed to complement each other. It is a matter of achieving the greatest amount of heat transfer from the unit. The key is to design the insert so air can move and extract the greatest amount of heat without cooling the firebox and hindering the efficiency of the unit. If the blower velocity were to be increased, it would give the impression that the unit heats more. However, it would actually blow cooler air and reduce the unit's efficiency. A hot firebox will burn better and cleaner. A slower but hotter air displacement is therefore always preferable. The same principle applies to the heat sensor available on many models. It is better for the heat sensor to activate the blower later, when the unit is very hot, rather than activating it too early and blow cooler air when the unit is still completing its start-up phase.

 

Can I install a liner with a 5-inch or 5.5-inch diameter?

All of our inserts are designed to function with a 6" liner. However, it is adequate to install a 5" or 5.5" liner when the masonry chimney is too tight for a 6" liner. Under certain conditions, the probability of a drafting issue is increased, which could favor smoke spillage and/or reduce combustion quality. But generally speaking, the vast majority of homeowners who properly install a 5" or 5.5" liner and use good heating techniques will be very satisfied with the performance of their wood insert.

Reviews

shawn borowicz - 2016-02-13   

This is the second century insert I've purchased and the first one back in 2009 and it's still going strong. Would always recommend these stoves.

Dean Ruggles - 2015-12-02   

So far the unit is fine. Looks well-built and has a great user manual with accurate drawings. Well done. I would recommend this unit to others. It came bundled with its own faceplate to cover the fireplace opening and enclose the unit. Nice. Also, fireplaceinsert.com had multiple options on flu liners and accessories, with percentage off. Nice break. Thank you.

Sean Gallagher - 2015-11-30   

I have only had this insert for two weeks now but I feel like it has been a good investment. I have it installed on the ground floor of a four over four colonial. The stove is in a den that is located in the back right corner of the house behind the garage in a masonry fireplace with a 13.5' exterior chimney. The stove cooks that room because I have trouble getting the heat out of the room due to the small door opening. This stove really puts out the heat. I was able to achieve an overnight burn, roughly 7.5 hours when I filled the firebox full. It was a mix of hard and softwoods and the temps were around 40 F. I think with oak I can achieve an overnight burn in freezing temps. All in all, I am very happy with the stove. The fan could be better, it doesn't really seem to push enough air but it's not that loud on low so that helps. The firebox is decent size and allows me to load 16 inch logs N/S. The glass stays pretty clear except for the bottom corners. I think the door assembly could be better. I would like to see a way to tighten the door because the gasket doesn't seal well enough to pass the dollar bill test. But, SBI said they may replace the door so that is a great sign of quality customer service.

Donald Jones - 2015-02-20   

This product works well, we've had some bad weather recently with wind chills near 30 below, we were able to minimize the use of our heat pump mini split system drastically and eliminate the use of our baseboard heat altogether ,which is a GREAT plus !!, I would like a stronger blower but, that's the only negative I see and that's more of a personal preference than a negative.

Ryan Kowalski - 2013-10-22   

We bought this insert to replace an old fireplace that was not very efficient. I ordered it on line and had it shipped to a store 40 min away and was able to pick it up in two weeks. Installation was fairly easy. Took myself and a buddy about 2 1/2 hours to install. Hardest part was moving into the correct spot since it was heavy. My wife and I are very impressed on how much heat this insert puts out. We installed it in our living room on the main floor and it will raise the temp about 10 degrees. Our upstairs is about 1800 square feet and we feel the heat at the end of the hallway where the bedrooms are and that's without using the blower. Only thing we did not like is how big the face plate is but it did cover our opening from our old fireplace.

Daniel Wiemer - 2013-08-24   

Looks absolutely fabulous, can't wait to try it out! Thank you for making such an affordable stove insert that is awesome!

richard gozdz - 2012-10-12   

we bought the fire insert to save money on heating this winter and just using it the first couple times, you can see how well it works. wood lasts so much longer than a regular fireplace and we are saving money and saving firewood. this was a great choice of a insert to get. I would recommend this to anyone looking for a easy was to keep the house warm and save money.

Don Warner - 2012-10-05   

I instlled this unit myself in approx. 2hrs start to finnish. The instuctions were easy to follow and well written. After the initial small fires to cure the paint, I was very impressed with the heat output and long burn time. I believe I will use less than half the wood of my old uncertified insert.